Monday, January 23, 2017

S&P500
2265.2
-6.11
-0.27%
NASDAQ
5552.94
-2.39
-0.04%
NYSE
11170.628
-22.164
-0.1980%
GOOG
819.31
+14.29
+1.78%
YHOO
42.4
+0.35
+0.83%
AAPL
120.08
+0.08
+0.07%
AMZN
817.88
+9.55
+1.18%
FB
128.93
+1.89
+1.49%
BPOP
44.17
-0.26
-0.59%
EVTC
17.4
-0.05
-0.29%
OFG
13.05
-0.05
-0.38%
FBP
6.54
-0.08
-1.21%
GTS
19.64
-0.1
-0.51%
S&P500
2265.2
-6.11
-0.27%
NASDAQ
5552.94
-2.39
-0.04%
NYSE
11170.628
-22.164
-0.1980%
GOOG
819.31
+14.29
+1.78%
YHOO
42.4
+0.35
+0.83%
AAPL
120.08
+0.08
+0.07%
AMZN
817.88
+9.55
+1.18%
FB
128.93
+1.89
+1.49%
BPOP
44.17
-0.26
-0.59%
EVTC
17.4
-0.05
-0.29%
OFG
13.05
-0.05
-0.38%
FBP
6.54
-0.08
-1.21%
GTS
19.64
-0.1
-0.51%

UN: Rebels, criminals, some army exploit Congo’s gold

By on January 9, 2017

In this photo taken Aug. 17, 2012, one of the few remaining miners digs out soil which will later be filtered for traces of cassiterite, the major ore of tin, at Nyabibwe mine, in eastern Congo. Gold is now the primary source of income for armed groups in eastern Congo, and is ending up in jewelry stores across the world, according to a report published Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012, by the Enough Project. Following American legislation requiring companies to track the origin of the minerals they use, armed groups have been unable to profit from the exploitation of tin, tungsten, and tantalum, and have turned instead to gold, which is easier to smuggle across borders. Gold miners, like cassiterite miners, work in extreme conditions, with crude equipment such as pick-axes and shovels. (Marc Hofer/AP)

In this photo taken Aug. 17, 2012, one of the few remaining miners digs out soil which will later be filtered for traces of cassiterite, the major ore of tin, at Nyabibwe mine, in eastern Congo. (Marc Hofer/AP)

UNITED NATIONS — Experts monitoring sanctions against Congo say some army officers, rebel groups and criminal networks are still illegally exploiting the country’s gold and mineral riches despite government and military bans.

In a report to the U.N. Security Council, the panel of experts says gold remains by far the mineral most used to finance rebel and criminal groups. It names several senior officers implicated in gold exploitation and trade, “on occasion in collaboration with private companies.”

The report circulated Monday says a gold-tracing program has not yet become operational and efforts for the government to control its natural resources are impeded by “the impunity enjoyed by wrongdoers,” corruption by a wide range of parties, and loopholes in implementing bans and monitoring.

It documents violations of human rights and an arms embargo.

image_print
Start your Free Trial for a limited time!