Sunday, June 26, 2022

Delegate Math: How Clinton Wraps Up Nomination By June 7

By on May 24, 2016

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton is closing in fast on the Democratic presidential nomination.

After losing three of four state contests in May, Clinton has maintained a lead over Bernie Sanders of 271 pledged delegates won in primaries and caucuses.

STONE RIDGE, VA - MAY 09:  Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks with voters at the Mug and Muffin Cafe May 9, 2016 in Stone Ridge, Virginia. The campaign stop in Virginia is a continuation of Clinton's "Breaking Down Barriers" tour highlighting her policies on affordable child care, paid family leave and health care.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

STONE RIDGE, VA – MAY 09: Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks with voters at the Mug and Muffin Cafe May 9, 2016 in Stone Ridge, Virginia. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

She is steadily picking up more support from superdelegates, the party leaders who can back any candidate of their choice, dampening Sanders’ chances further even as he insists he can win them over later this summer. In the last week, Clinton picked up 12 new superdelegate endorsements while Sanders netted two, according to an Associated Press survey.

When including superdelegates, Clinton’s lead grows to 2,305, or 97 percent of the 2,383 delegates needed to win the nomination.

The Democratic primaries are now in a two-week break. They resume in the Virgin Islands on June 4 and Puerto Rico on June 5, with 67 delegates at stake.

Just 78 delegates short, Clinton remains on a glide path to reaching 2,383 on June 7 after polls close at 8 p.m. EDT in New Jersey.

Some things to know about the final weeks of the delegate race:

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THE SCORE

Clinton has won 23 states, while Sanders prevailed in 20. She also holds a razor-thin lead in Kentucky, where the race remained too close to call.

The last six states vote on June 7, followed by the District of Columbia on June 14.

Clinton won bigger primary states including Florida, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania and also posted blowout victories in the South. That has given her a substantial lead in delegates over Sanders based solely on primaries and caucuses, 1,768 to 1,497. Sanders was successful in smaller caucus states and won Michigan and Wisconsin.

When including superdelegates, Clinton has 2,305 to Sanders’ 1,539.

Clinton also holds an advantage of roughly 3 million raw votes, based on AP’s tabulation — 13.2 million to nearly 10.2 million for Sanders. The vote totals do not include Iowa, Nevada, Maine, Alaska, Washington and Wyoming — caucus states where the AP tabulated delegate equivalents, not raw votes; Sanders won four of them.

 

The Associated Press

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