Monday, March 1, 2021

San Juan mayor seeks to control noise pollution

By on February 4, 2021

San Juan Mayor Miguel Romero (Courtesy)

New municipal executive order in Capital targets infractors

SAN JUAN — The mayor of San Juan, Miguel Romero Lugo, announced Thursday his issuance of an executive order to reinforce compliance with several laws and ordinances to control unnecessary noise and noise pollution in the capital, the San Juan City Hall Press Office announced.

Romero said the proliferation of vehicles modified to emit high-volume sounds has become a noise pollution problem that affects San Juan’s residents.

“Citizens’ healthy coexistence, tranquility and peace are necessary elements for the Capital City of Puerto Rico to regain its position as a jurisdiction that encourages the repopulation of its various communities and maintains an environment that results in a better quality of life for all our residents,” reads Executive Order No. 008, issued by Romero Lugo this week.

The mayor also stressed that, with the order, he seeks to strengthen compliance with existing laws and ordinances that address noise pollution. With the order, the Municipal Police of San Juan will be able to intervene in situations where excessive and unnecessary sounds disturb the tranquility of the communities in the city, reducing the potential risk to the health of residents and visitors.

Among the laws that will be enforced are the law to dispose of amplifiers or loudspeakers when they affect public tranquility, Act 155 of 1937; and the law to suppress unnecessary noise of all kinds and establish penalties, Act 71 of 1940. The latter describes unnecessary noise as any loud sound that is disturbing, intense and frequent, and that affects tranquility.

Romero also said that compliance with the Puerto Rico Vehicle and Traffic Law will be enforced by the Municipal Police, specifically Article 14.15 on sound deadening and engine acceleration systems, and Article 14.21 on the illegal use and installation of sirens and bells in unauthorized private motor vehicles.

As he explained, the order is ascribed to compliance with Article 241 of the Puerto Rico Penal Code on disturbing the peace and other articles related to the prohibition of unnecessary noise and contained in the Codification of Penal Legislation of the Municipality of San Juan.

Romero concluded by underlining that the detailed laws and ordinances do not imply a limitation in the measures that the Municipal Police of San Juan could utilize to address the problem of noise pollution in San Juan.